Third Session Study Guide 2

Third Session Study Guide

Lesson Two

(Amino Acids)

 

There are twenty amino acids. The twenty amino acids join together in various ways to form many proteins. This is just like our alphabet which we can use to form many words. These amino acids link together to form all the proteins in nature from proteins found in insects to those in animals and in humans.

 

Eight of the amino acids are called “essential”, not because we don’t need the others, but because our bodies can make the others from nutrients that we consume.  All twenty are necessary for proper body function. It is interesting that corn, rice, beans, wheat and potatoes have every essential amino acid in them. The amount of the essential amino acids found in these foods far exceeds the recommended amount. Therefore, a diet of unrefined starches and vegetables meets the needs of children and adults.

 

Protein recommendations from the WHO World Health Organization) are: men 5%, women 5%, pregnant women 6% and children 5%. That’s all. Compare that to the 30% to 40% protein in the SAD (Standard American Diet).

 

Scientific studies have determined the minimum amino acid requirements. Those numbers are doubled to give us a “recommended” or “definitely safe” level”. If we compare those numbers to the amounts in starches and vegetables we can see that it would be impossible to design a diet using these foods that would not provided enough amino acids; these foods meet all of our needs.

 

8 ESSENTIAL AMINO ACIDS

(We need to get these from our foods).

William Rose is an important protein researcher; he discovered the last three amino acids and during the 1940s he determined the amounts of essential amino acids necessary for humans.

 

Minimum

Recommended

Corn

Rice

Wheat

Potatoes

Tryptophan

.25

.5

.66

.71

1.4

.8

Phenylalanine

.28

.56

6.13

3.1

5.9

3.6

Leucine

1.1

2.2

12

5.5

8.

4.1

Isoleucine

.7

1.4

4.1

3

5.2

3.6

Lysine

.8

1.6

4.1

2.5

3.2

4.4

Valine

.8

1.6

6.8

4.5

5.5

4.4

Methionine

.11

.22

2.1

1.1

1.8

1.

Threonine

.5

1

4.5

2.5

3.5

3.4

TOTALS

20

37

109

64

120

82

 

 

Lesson Two Questions:

1. What do amino acids combine to form?

2. What does “essential” mean in regard to amino acids?

3. What percentage of protein in our diet is recommended by the WHO?

4. Which foods supply all the essential amino acids in abundance?

Leave a Reply